#199: Everybody’s Trying to Be My Baby

Just like Ringo’s, George Harrison’s vocal spotlight on the Beatles for Sale album was an underwhelming Carl Perkins cover. This one at least feels slightly less lazy, and needless to say, the vocal is a lot stronger (sorry Ringo), but there’s still a sense of going through the motions. My favorite part of it is the fake-out ending, a technique I always love in songs.

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The only thing I like more than fake endings? Happy Endings. Bring it back, Netflix!

 

And of course, this brings to a close the great Carl Perkins vs. Larry Williams war of 2016, with Larry Williams coming out on top as his “Bad Boy” is still in the running. It’s been real, Carl.

#199: Everybody’s Trying to Be My Baby

#200: Mr. Moonlight

When you start playing “Mr. Moonlight” and hear John Lennon sing the title with such gusto, it’s hard not to get excited about what’s to come. Indeed, if the entire song were as exciting as the first four seconds, this would be one of their finest covers. But man, does it go downhill fast. You can point to so many elements–the uninspired backing vocals, the inane lyrics–pretty much anything but John’s lead vocal, which gives the track some redeeming value, but it’s clear what the nadir of this recording is. Paul McCartney’s organ solo is so un-Beatle-y that if the queen heard it she would revoke his knighthood.

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Actually, it’s surprising he didn’t somehow lose it in his divorce with Heather Mills.

 

The worst part? There was no reason whatsoever for “Mr. Moonlight” to take up space on Beatles for Sale. Ringo and George both had their vocal spotlights, weak as they were. And on the very same day the band first tackled “Mr. Moonlight,” they also recorded the fiery “Leave My Kitten Alone,” which inexplicably languished in the vaults for more than 30 years despite being superior to not only “Mr. Moonlight,” but probably a good half of the rest of Beatles for Sale too.

#200: Mr. Moonlight

#201: Tell Me Why

Ladies and gentlemen, we have hit a landmark with this one. “Tell Me Why” is the first original Beatles composition on the countdown that was not tossed off and given to Ringo like a bag of moldy tangerines. In his later years, John Lennon was notorious for denouncing many of his Beatles songs as throwaways, but he was spot-on in this case. “They needed another upbeat song [for the movie A Hard Day’s Night] and I just knocked it off,” he remarked in 1980.

Some speculate Continue reading “#201: Tell Me Why”

#201: Tell Me Why

#208: Matchbox

The best thing I can say about “Matchbox” is that it’s short, clocking in at just under two minutes. Somehow, though, this Carl Perkins cover still manages to outstay its welcome. Listen to the first 30 seconds and you pretty much have the gist of the whole thing.

sting

Also an accurate description of every song Sting has released after The Police.

 

Apparently “Matchbox” was recorded Continue reading “#208: Matchbox”

#208: Matchbox

#210: Slow Down

Larry Williams may not be a household name like Chuck Berry or Little Richard, but his influence on the Beatles, especially John Lennon, cannot be understated. The group tackled three Williams compositions on record, which ties him with Carl Perkins as the most frequently covered songwriter in their core discography. (Berry likely holds the title if you expand the territory to include BBC recordings and early concert repertoire.)

So if you’re keeping track Continue reading “#210: Slow Down”

#210: Slow Down